Contact info

Calle Martin Jose Olaya 162, Miraflores.

7058964

990100079

icgeneticsstudies@gmail.com

Cryptic ins(4;11)(q21;q23q23) detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization: a variant of t(4;11)(q21;q23) in an infant with a precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia report of a second case

We report the chromosomal findings in a 4-year-old female with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The diagnostic karyotype showed an isochromosome 7q, i(7)(q10), as well as questionable rearrangements on 9p and 11q. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies on both interphase and metaphase cells using the MLL ‘‘break-apart’’ and the centromeric chromosome 4 probes were instrumental in the characterization of an MLL gene rearrangement, which was cryptic by conventional cytogenetic analysis. Specifically, the FISH pattern was consistent with an insertion of the 5’ region of the MLL gene into chromosome 4 at band q21, most likely a variant t(4;11)(q21;q23). This is the second case of FISH detection of an ins(4;11) in ALL. Our case exemplifies the importance of FISH in the further characterization of precursor B-cell ALL cases without any apparent prognostically significant chromosomal abnormalities.

Download the full paper HERE.

Category: Scientific Papers

Abstract

Coexistence of inv(16)andt(9;22)is a rare chromosomal aberration, one that has been described in chronic  myelogenous leukemia (CML), mainly in myeloid blast crisis, and de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

Download the full paper HERE.

Category: Scientific Papers

Abstract

JAK2 is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase whose gene is located on chromosome 9p24. It is involved in the regulation of different cytokines and growth factors and plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of myeloproliferative neoplasms (Smith et al., 2008). Translocations involving the JAK2 locus are uncommon with just a few cases described in the literature, and they usually lead to a fusion protein with JAK2 (Patnaik et al., 2010). Chromosome 9p24 abnormalities have been described in myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms including chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, CD10+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, T-cell ALL and chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMD) (Smith et al., 2008; Lacronique et al., 1997). Although the breakpoints of each translocation are known, characterization of the partner gene has not been done in many of the cases reported due to insufficient sample or other factors. In the present study we review all translocations involving JAK2 that have been reported in the literature.

Download the full paper HERE.

Category: Scientific Papers

Abstract

Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma comprising of greater than 30% of adult non-Hodgkin Lymphomas. DLBCL represents a diverse set of lymphomas, defined as diffuse proliferation of large B lymphoid cells. Numerous cytogenetic studies including karyotypes and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), as well as morphological, biological, clinical, microarray and sequencing technologies have attempted to categorize DLBCL into morphological variants, molecular and immunophenotypic subgroups, as well as distinct disease entities. Despite such efforts, most lymphoma remains undistinguishable and falls into DLBCL, not otherwise specified (DLBCL-NOS). The advent of microarray-based studies (chromosome, RNA, gene expression, etc) has provided a plethora of high-resolution data that could potentially facilitate the finer classification of DLBCL.
This review covers the microarray data currently published for DLBCL. We will focus on these types of data; 1) array based CGH; 2) classical CGH; and 3) gene expression profiling studies. The aims of this review were three-fold: (1) to catalog chromosome loci that are present in at least 20% or more of distinct DLBCL subtypes; a detailed list of gains and losses for different subtypes was generated in a table form to illustrate specific chromosome loci affected in selected subtypes; (2) to determine common and distinct copy number alterations among the different subtypes and based on this information, characteristic and similar chromosome loci for the different subtypes were depicted in two separate chromosome ideograms; and, (3) to list re-classified subtypes and those that remained indistinguishable after review of the microarray data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort to compile and review available literatures on microarray analysis data and their practical utility in classifying DLBCL subtypes. 
Although conventional cytogenetic methods such as Karyotypes and FISH have played a major role in classification schemes of lymphomas, better classification models are clearly needed to further understanding the biology, disease outcome and therapeutic management of DLBCL. In summary, microarray data reviewed here can provide better subtype specific classifications models for DLBCL.
Keywords: DLBCL, Array CGH, Genomic profiles
Download the full paper HERE.
Category: Scientific Papers

Abstract

The gene RUNX1 at chromosome 21q22 encodes the alpha subunit of Core binding factor (CBF), a heterodimeric transcription factor involved in the development of normal hematopoiesis. Translocations of RUNX1 are seen in several types of leukemia with at least 21 identified partner genes. The cryptic t(7;21)(p22;q22) rearrangement involving the USP42 gene appears to be a specific and recurrent cytogenetic abnormality. Eight of the 9 cases identified in the literature with this translocation were associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), with the remaining case showing refractory anemia with excess blasts, type 2. Herein, we present a patient with two preceding years of leukopenia and one year of anemia prior to the diagnosis of AML, NOS with monocytic differentiation (myelomonocytic leukemia) whose conventional cytogenetics showed an abnormal clone with 5q deletion. Interphase FISH using LSI RUNX1/RUNXT1 showed three signals for RUNX1. FISH studies on previously G-banded metaphases showed the extra RUNX1 signal on the short arm of chromosome 7. Further characterization using the subtelomeric 7p probe showed a cryptic 7;21 translocation. Our case and eight previously reported leukemic cases with the t(7;21)(p22;q22) appear to share similar features including monocytic differentiation, immunophenotypic aberrancies (often with CD56 and/or CD7), and a generally poor response to standard induction chemotherapy. About 80% of these cases had loss of 5q material as an additional abnormality at initial diagnosis or relapse. These findings suggest that t(7;21) may represent a distinct recurrent cytogenetic abnormality associated with AML. The association between the t(7;21) and 5q aberrancies appears to be non-random, however the pathogenetic connection remains unclear. Additional studies to evaluate for RUNX1 partner genes may be considered for AML patients with RUNX1 rearrangement and 5q abnormalities; however knowledge of the prognostic implications of this rearrangement is still limited.
Keywords: AML, Acute myeloid leukemia, t(7;21), t(7;21)(p22;q22), RUNX1, USP42
Download the full paper HERE.
Category: Scientific Papers

Introduction

Individuals with pericentric inversions are at risk for producing offspring with chromosomal gains and losses, while those carrying paracentric inversions usually produce unviable gametes [Madan, 1995]. In this current study, we present a newborn with dysmorphic features and malformations, whose karyotype showed an abnormal copy of chromomosome 7 described at first as add(7)(q32) as well as mos 45,X/47,XXX. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed an interstitial deletion in the long arm of chromosome 7 involving bands q35 to q36.3 but retaining the 7q subtelomere. The patient’s deletion is believed to be due to meiotic recombination in the inversion loop in the phenotypically normal father who seems to carry two paracentric inversions in the long arm of chromosome 7, which was described as rec(7)(7pter->q35::q36.3->7qter)pat.
The abnormal copy of chromosome 7 in the father has been described as: der(7)(7pter->q22.1::q36.3->q35::q22.1->q35::q36.3->7qter). This is a unique karyotype that to our knowledge has not been previously reported in the literature and predisposes to meiotic recombination that can result in deletions or duplications of 7q35–36.  2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Key words: recombinant chromosome 7; mosaicism
Download the full paper HERE.
Category: Scientific Papers

Abstract

Partial trisomy 2p is typically associated with partial monosomy of another chromosomal segment and results from a balanced translocation in one of the parents. Inverted duplications with terminal deletions have been reported in an increasing number of chromosomes. Several cases initially interpreted as terminal duplications have instead been documented to represent inverted duplications with terminal deletions. Inv dup del(2p) has been reported in patients who manifest the clinical findings of trisomy 2p syndrome. Here we report on a 2-month-old girl with inv dup del(2p) and clinical manifestations that overlap those found commonly in partial 2p trisomy, as previously reported in the literature. Her clinical picture helps delineate the phenotype of 2p duplication disorders. 
Key words: partial trisomy 2; inverted duplication 2p; terminal deletion 2pter; CGH; FISH
Download the full paper HERE.
Category: Scientific Papers

Most Wanted WP eCommerce Themes

Thursday, 22 May 2014 00:00

Lorem Ipsum. Proin gravida nibh vel velit auctor aliquet. Aenean sollicitudin, lorem quis bibendum auctor, nisi elit consequat ipsum, nec sagittis sem nibh id elit. Duis sed odiot

Category: Latest Posts
Page 2 of 2